Curriculum

Class Six Country Presentations

»Posted by on Mar 10, 2014 in Curriculum | 0 comments

Class 6 4Class Six children study both the rise and fall of Rome and the affect Greek and Roman culture had on European civilization up through the Middle Ages. As part of that study, the sixth graders chose a European country to research. They are asked to research the people who live there, country flag, common occupations, recreation, foods, language, clothing, and more.

Students in sixth grade are ready for new challenges in their thinking as they prepare for being young adults in middle school where they will be asked to think of themselves as part of a greater whole. As part of this transition, the country project is not just a paper or class presentation, but an event Class Six hosts for the third, fourth and fifth grade classes.

This year, each Class Six student made a poster board representing what they learned about their country and presented the information to their school mates, who then were allowed to tour the presentations, ask questions about the countries and sample food students prepared related to their country.  Parents were invited to attend as well.

This year, everyone enjoyed Copenhagen potatoes, perogies, strudel, gingerbread, and Irish soda bread to name a few.

Here are some more pictures from this year’s ceremony.

Class 6 5

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In Session Class Tour March 12th

»Posted by on Feb 27, 2014 in Curriculum, School News | 0 comments

Experience Waldorf first hand by walking through in-session classes on March 12th. See our teachers doing what they love and see students loving to learn. Administrators will be available to answer questions both before and after our in-session tour which begins Wednesday at 9am. Come Experience the Waldorf Difference.

Can’t come on the 12th? Click Here to Watch a Vrtual Tour of our school as seen on the TV Show Sustainable Life.

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SGWS After Care

»Posted by on Feb 24, 2014 in Curriculum, School News | 0 comments

FallLeaves1Aftercare at Spring Garden Waldorf is an important part of our school community. We offer children a safe, active and fun place to spend time before and after school while their parents fulfill work and other obligations.

Children in our aftercare program spend much of their time outdoors engaged in free play, while supervised by caring adults with childhood education or care experience. During inclement weather, structured play opportunities are also available such as basketball, board games, and puzzles. Playground and gym equipment is provided to the children and quiet areas are also available for students wishing to do homework.

Our Aftercare Director, Tori Bolanz, graduated from the University of Akron with a BA in Early Childhood Education. Tori is also currently a Lead teacher in SGWS Early Childhood. Aftercare staff member, Olivia Moss, is a University of Akron student and a graduate of The Visual and Performing Arts Program at Firestone High School with experience as a domestic assistant and child care provider.

We are dedicated to keeping this offering affordable for our community. Our program costs only $5/hour and hours are 7:15-8:15 in the morning and 3:30-6:00 in the evening. Additional children in the family are $4/hr.

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Ice Skating at Kent State

»Posted by on Feb 20, 2014 in Curriculum, Just For Fun, School News | 0 comments

LoucileIceSkateIt’s that time of year again! On February 28, we welcome back our annual tradition of spending three Friday afternoons on the ice.

 

Grade One students are introduced to this tradition by their Eighth Grade Buddy, and all grades share the ice. New students find a supportive and safe environment to learn to skate, and for many students (and more than a few parents), our ice skating trips are the highlight of the long winter months. For a nominal skate rental fee, parents can join their children on the ice, or just sit rink-side and visit with other members of our community.

 

Web MD writer recently interviewed Angela Smith, MD, an attending surgeon at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, who had this to say about ice skating’s benefits, “I think [ice skating] truly addresses all components of fitness at any level,” she says. “It’s good for building lower-body muscles including the hips, hamstrings, quadriceps, and calves. Skating also boosts balance, flexibility, quickness, and agility.”

 

We agree! Which, along with the fact that it’s great fun for our children and out community, keeps ice skating a tradition here at SGWS. In order to orchestrate this fun event, we need parents help.
  • Permission slips will be sent home for all students in Grades 1 through 8 by the end of this week. Please return them promptly.
  • We will need many parents to help drive students to and from the Ice Arena. We leave the school at 12:30 and leave Kent State at 2:45. We are generally back at the school by 3:30. (If you wish to pick up your child at the ice arena, you must be there by3:00.)
  • Our skating dates are February 28, March 7, and March 14, and we are always in need of drivers and chaperones.

 

Hope to see you at the ice rink!

 

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Movement, Games, and the Waldorf Curriculum

»Posted by on Jan 8, 2014 in Curriculum, School News | 0 comments

JeffTThe Parent Council is hosting a presentation by Jeff Tunkey of the AHE Friday, February 7, 2014 – 7:00 p.m. at SGWS to discuss the role of movement and games in the Waldorf curriculum.  Jeff is a member of the Aurora Waldorf School faculty and the Association of Healing Education board.

There is a growing body of research in education and neuroscience about the link between learning and movement. Studies have shown that physical changes from exercise can boost cognition, such as the increase in blood flow, brain mass, and neuron development. But research like this study about critical thinking and dance, or this one done through Seattle Public Schools, also connect dots between boosted academic performance and learning through movement.

For several years, our guest speaker, Jeff Tunkey, has been the Games (Gym) teacher, Care Group Coordinator, and, until recently, Extra Lesson Teacher at Aurora Waldorf School. He is an experienced speaker and has led several faculty workshops. You can learn more about Jeff’s work on his website MovementforChildhood.com.

For more information about this upcoming event, email Diane Miskinis.

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Common Core and Your Child

»Posted by on Dec 16, 2013 in Curriculum, Early Childhood, Research | 1 comment

Grade3-2Opponents call it the One-Size-Fits-All education, while supporters say it’s holding children to higher, more in-depth learning standards than current achievement tests. Common Core Standards are rolling out this year and are estimated to cost school systems millions. But what does it mean for families?

 

Too much, too soon, too stressful

Children will be tested earlier and more regularly. Child clinical psychologist Dr. Megan Koschnick is concerned that many of the early childhood Common Core Standards are developmentally inappropriate for young students not yet reaching Piaget’s concrete operational stage. And her peers at the American Principles Project are concerned that no developmental or neuropsychologists were involved in the committees for creating the Common Core. According to Koschnick, there is also little to no scientific research supporting the aptitude recommendations at early grade levels.

As Koschnick said in this video:

When standards are not developmentally appropriate, “Teachers are going to see typically developing children as delayed, parents may be informed that their children are behind and kids are going to get measured against inappropriate standards and might be held back or tracked into remedial classes that they don’t really need.”

FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In addition to the standards being potentially inappropriate for a child’s cognitive abilities, principals in New York, who adopted Common Core early, also say the standards are causing undue stress to little ones. They have written an open letter of protest saying the Common Core was too hard on younger children and they reported crying and physical ailments like vomiting and wetting during test taking.

And it’s no wonder the children are stressed. In Ohio and several other states, there are strict consequences for failing the third grade test. Students unable to pass a retest will not go to fourth grade with their peers. Ohio has joined others in the 3rd grade common core retention law meaning 3rd graders who fail to demonstrate sufficient reading ability on the new state standardized test will be held back.

Are Late Readers really “Behind?”

Winston Churchill -- Behind but not below average.

Winston Churchill — Behind but not below average.

Many great thinkers and leaders throughout history reported being late readers or late bloomers in general including Albert Einstein who could barely read in the third grade and Nobel Laureates Richard Axel and Gerardus Hooft. Would Winston Chruchill, who failed 6th grade in a traditional education system, have passed a Common Core third grade test? Hard to say. But children who are labeled as “behind” in today’s world are often thought to be, or believe themselves to be, below average.

But if a slow-reading third grader is agreed to be “behind” what is required for testing, does that mean he/she is developmentally delayed or below average? The new standards push early reading and many studies show that those who start reading at 5 versus 7 show no differences by age 11.  Does this mean the only benefit to early reading proficiency is the ability to take tests?  In today’s public school system that question is irrelevant, as is the psychological concern of labeling students “behind” when they are initially slower readers.

 

What’s The Common Core FOR?

As Common Core strives to raise standards among global peers, many find it telling that top Western school systems prescribe to an opposite approach. The ever-popular, idealized Finnish school system does not allow children to even begin academics before age seven, which means reading instruction is delayed. But students in this school system do not need to read test instructions by first or even third grade. In fact, students in these high performing schools are not required to take tests or even receive grades until 8th grade.

Sir Ken Robinson’s popular TED talk explores the idea that U.S. education is outdated because it was created during the industrial revolution for jobs that no longer exist and is also modeled after an industrial process rather than considering the unique skills and talents of individuals. He maintains that a culture of testing and standardization has inappropriately labeled students and stunted curriculum. And often he points to the Finnish system as a model for how to address individual learning styles while still competing globally.

 

Waldorf Education and The Common Core

Grade8Waldorf Education is often cited for mimicking the Finnish system, which has a low-stress, non-testing environment for early elementary students and also takes a different approach to reading, with comprehension skills being taught first and phonics decoding beginning in first grade.  What is core in Waldorf standards is catering to a student’s individual learning style with reverence and respect for each child and their gifts.

Waldorf educators also encourage a love of lifelong learning, which they believe cannot flourish in an environment where being slightly behind in one skill set:

  • Causes undue stress and defeatist attitude.
  • Elicits a label for a child as being less intelligent.
  • Leads to a child being unnecessarily held back – delaying learning of other skill sets and social growth.

Waldorf Educators also subscribe to Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences, which  deconstructs the idea of one “general” intelligence ruling someone’s abilities. In other words, a slow reader is not a slow child.

Is your child at risk of being labeled “behind” because they are a late reader or an anxious test taker? Consider Waldorf. Learn more at our website, visit us, request information or call 330-666-0574 to speak with our Admissions Director.

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