Research

Waldorf Education Subjects & Multiple Intelligences

»Posted by on Nov 17, 2014 in Research | 0 comments

Chart Created by Jeff Tunkey at http://www.movementforchildhood.com/

Chart Created by Jeff Tunkey at http://www.movementforchildhood.com/

Ever known a math whiz who can’t jump rope? Or maybe you know the world’s most competent linguist who is tone deaf or cannot balance his checkbook. Our daily experiences demonstrate that smart” is not defined by a single measure. Howard Gardner, American developmental psychologist and Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, developed the theory of multiple intelligences that has revolutionized the way educators think about learning.

The idea of one “general” intelligence ruling someone’s abilities has become an outdated notion since Gardner published his theory of multiple intelligences in 1983. Waldorf educators, following the impulses of Austrian scientist and philosopher Rudolph Steiner, have been focusing on the education of the whole child since the late 19th century.

Recently, Jeff Tunkey at http://www.movementforchildhood.com/ created this comprehensive chart about how Waldorf schools’ subject classes help develop multiple intelligences in our children.

We at Spring Garden Waldorf School have created a detailed blog series discussing how each of Gardner’s eight intelligences is fostered in the Waldorf classroom. Read more on how each of these intelligences are developed at Spring Garden Waldorf by clicking the links below:

Verbal / linguistic

Logical/ mathematical

Body/ kinesthetic

Visual/ spatial

Music/ rhythmic

Interpersonal & Intrapersonal

Naturalistic

Spiritualistic

 

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Coffee and Conversation – Adolescent Math Development

»Posted by on Nov 6, 2014 in Curriculum, Research | 0 comments

Math and developmental differences in boys and girls between the ages of 12-14 (Grades 6, 7, and 8)

Last Wednesday, Spring Garden hosted speaker Cate Hunko, M.Ed., as she discussed Waldorf education and her experiences teaching math to 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students.

Ms. Hunko has been a Waldorf Teacher for over 15 years, is the mother of two daughters, and was previously an artist working as an automotive designer — all experiences that have helped fuel her passion to understand how young teens of both genders approach and process mathematics.

During the algebra block in Grade 7, Ms. Hunko noticed a divergence in her class between the boys and girls. This difference had never presented itself in the younger grades, where all children (for the most part) approached and learned math similarly. She wanted to know why she was seeing this happen in the older grades and began researching the topic.

Her studies led her to information on a developmental split that occurs when children enter puberty. Their physical maturity, it seems, alters their brains and their approach to mathematics.

EducationinActionCropWhile she acknowledges that every child is different, she has seen a few trends in differences between boys and girls. In her experience, boys in middle school seem comfortable with numbers and willing to move through the process of math without much questioning. As they gain new skills, they can become competitive about their accomplishments.

Girls have no trouble memorizing formulas, but they often seem more separated from the black-and-white process of mathematics; instead, they display a deep drive to understand the how and why of the calculations. The competition the males bring to the table is not always engaging or encouraging to their female peers. As girls bring memorized formulas to problems, they often hesitate in the application of those formulas, standing outside of the process and analyzing it instead of just jumping in.

According to Hunko, this difference between male and female students often requires teachers to give young women more time at math, both in the short term and long term, while understanding that their careful approach does not indicate a lack of skill.

She says, “They want to be intuitive about it, but sometimes it takes time for them to set that aside in order to accomplish the task.

What does giving students “time” mean?

IMG_1261Hunko says, “It’s important not to divide junior high children into categories for math as ‘talented’

and ‘not talented,’ especially considering that more young women may fall into this lesser category during this important time in their physical development.”

Hunko feels adolescent girls are often left behind in STEM learning because adolescent boys, who often have fewer physical challenges and different brain development than girls during puberty, seem quicker at math – a quickness that doesn’t necessarily correspond with innate talent. However, it is a relatively short time before the young women can catch up with their male peers, and a slower and more dedicated teaching style that avoids labeling can ensure female students’ success.

What does effective STEM teaching look like for young women?

Hunko recommends engaging young women in both the history and practicality of math, but also stresses that they cannot stay in that place in their mind as they put what they know into practice. “They must transfer that enthusiasm to the formulas they’ve committed to memory and then they must focus, stay grounded, and commit to the formula.”

Hunko feels that even more than the teaching itself, the home life and support of parents makes the biggest difference in women entering STEM careers. “Many of the women currently in STEM had parents in STEM. Parent support in the sciences is key. First off, don’t give up on your girls, even if they struggle with math during junior high. That doesn’t mean they’re not math people. Don’t use labels like that, and don’t discuss your own struggles so they have a chance to be true to themselves. Don’t say you ‘also hated’ math. Struggle and hate are not always the same.”

Hunko believes it is women’s different approach to math – careful, focused on the big picture, and less competitive – that makes female career roles in STEM essential.

“When it comes to teaching, the pendulum is swinging to a far side in STEM right now. We need to bring it back to the center. Women have a lot to offer the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math industry. They bring a different and essential perspective.”

 

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Make Time for Routine

»Posted by on Oct 17, 2014 in Research | 0 comments

Waldorf Early Childhood revolves around predictable routines.

Waldorf Early Childhood revolves around predictable routines.

Routine is good for children. It makes them feel safe: kids who have solid routines know what’s coming most of the time and can better adapt to the occasional unexpected event. Routine also helps make parents’ lives easier and improves children’s behavior. But in modern life, hectic schedules often disrupt routine. While ditching a formal dinnertime or extending bedtime may seem to relieve stress in the moment, research implies otherwise.

A Syracuse University metastudy of 32 studies of routine and ritual in family life between 1950 and 2000, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, found that “although families may be challenged to meet the busy demands of juggling work and home, there is reason to believe that routines and rituals may ease the stress of daily living.”

One way in which routines help relieve family stress is by helping the long-term behavior of children. Take, for example, the results of a study reported in this article from The Guardian.  The University College London did a study of bedtimes and routines in three-, five, and seven-year-olds and found that “children put to bed at the same time each day are significantly less likely to misbehave,” and that “children who had changeable bedtimes between the ages of three and five displayed better behavior by age seven if their bedtimes had become more regular.”

Another study, published in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and reported here at Reuters, found that “children who took part in more family routines were more likely to be socially and emotionally advanced” and that routines “can help with what we call ‘executive function': skills like problem-solving, negotiation, planning and delayed gratification. Having good executive function skills is absolutely important for school success.”

So what routines should you establish? Any routines and rituals created by your family hold value. This 2007 study by Mary Spagnola, Ph.D., and Barbara H. Fiese, Ph.D., published in the journal Infants and Children,” said any regular family practice encouraging emotional connection showed beneficial results. However, the study identified three specific routines they noted as contributors to healthy child development:

  • A nightly dinner routine was found to provide rich and complex language development experiences.
  • Reading routines were shown to improve literacy.
  • Daily living routines, like meal preparation, homework, and age-appropriate extracurricular activities, were found to foster social skills and independence.

No matter what routines you and your family decide to embrace, the research shows that it will help balance your child’s behavior, build academic and social skills, and relieve stress in the family.

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Public School Teacher Chooses SGWS

»Posted by on Jul 17, 2014 in Curriculum, Early Childhood, Research | 0 comments

Many of our prospective parents wrestle with the decision of whether to send their children to a public school or to Spring Garden Waldorf School. There are many differences between public education and Waldorf education, though a general summary might be that Waldorf education places a high value on art, critical thinking, and creativity, and does not begin academic instruction before the age of seven. Public school, on the other hand, puts a high value on standardized and measurable academics, with a focus on math and reading starting at age five.

Watch this video to learn why one public school teacher chose to send her son to Spring Garden Waldorf School. Or for read this article more information about the differences between Waldorf and Public school.

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Waldorf Education for Gifted Children

»Posted by on Jul 17, 2014 in Curriculum, Research | 0 comments

If you have a young child who is advanced in academics, is an early reader, or seems ready for formal schooling at an early age, you may believe that Waldorf Education isn’t the right choice for you. You may worry that your bright child will be bored in a Waldorf classroom.

However, in this article, Dr. Richard House, a senior lecturer at Roehampton University’s Research Centre for Therapeutic Education, recommends delaying formal schooling for bright children. He says, “…gifted pupils from relatively affluent backgrounds suffered the most from being pushed ‘too far, too fast.’” He quoted a major U.S. study, carried out over eight decades, that demonstrated how “children’s ‘run-away intellect’ actually benefited from being slowed down in the early years, allowing them to develop naturally.”

The absence of worksheets and standardized testing in the early grades does not mean that Spring Garden does not introduce these young pupils to advanced concepts. Students in Grades One and Two are actively taught mathematical concepts along with reading and writing, nature and science, music, art and foreign language — all in a multi-sensory and engaged manner.

Joanna Caley, mother of a Spring Garden student, talks about the benefits her gifted daughter experienced when given a more balanced Waldorf education at Spring Garden.

Click to learn more about Waldorf Education:

Research about Early Elementary Education

Early Elementary Education at Spring Garden Waldorf School

Learning to Read in Waldorf Schools

 

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Combating the Summer Slide… Waldorf Style

»Posted by on Jun 27, 2014 in Just For Fun, Research | 0 comments

Tina Phillips

Tina Phillips

You’ve joined your library’s reading challenge and bought a workbook for math facts, but here are some Waldorf-inspired ways to help your children get the most out of summer and stay sharp.

  • Take a Hike

Not only is hiking fun for the whole family, but according to this University of Michigan study, it boosts cognitive performance.

  • Work in a Garden

Did you know?  Sage College Scientists found that “ingesting or breathing in a common soil bacterium found in nature reduces anxiety and improves learning.”  Don’t have a garden? Work in ours! Find Work Dates HERE.

  • Send Them Outside

The National Wildlife Federation has filled a PDF with all the latest research about the benefits of unstructured outdoor play, proving that “nature may indeed be the best kind of nurture…” 

  • Let Them Get Bored

As this BBC news article states right in the title: Children should be allowed to get bored.  Dr. Teresa Belton said, “Cultural expectations that children should be constantly active could hamper the development of their imagination.”That means they don’t have to be entertained while you need to work.  This article from Parenting Science explores over a decade of studies about the benefits of unstructured play time. The author is careful to note that free play does not mean physical education classes or sports or summer camps. Free play is unstructured play time, which has been proven to help math skills, language development, and creative problem solving.

  • Read a Fairy Tale

“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.”  ― Albert EinsteinThis fabulous article on ImaginationSoup.net perfectly encapsulates the importance of reading fairy tales to children.

So, put away the flashcards and go enjoy a smart summer!

 

 

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