The Case for a Summer Slowdown

»Posted by on Jun 12, 2015 in Early Childhood, Just For Fun, Research | 0 comments

Camp5If you Google, “Summer break with children,” you get two types of search results — a variety of activity lists or articles about the evils of summer’s off. Turns out they call it “summer fade,” which is a one month backslide in learning coupled with an increase in Body Mass Index (BMI) for kids.

Many parents counter these issues with a rigorous schedule of summer camps, sport practice and tutoring. While watching television all day with a box of pop tarts is obviously not good, there are some other options beyond a highly structured and scheduled summer.

When planning, or not planning your child’s summer, consider the scientifically proven benefits of  boredom, free play and time in nature. These research studies about children and learning support the idea of a summer slowdown.

In a recent BBC news article, Children should be allowed to get bored,  Dr Teresa Belton said, “Cultural expectations that children should be constantly active could hamper the development of their imagination.”

Now couple that reality with studies connecting time in nature with increased learning and emotional capabilities. The positive results of being outdoors for children are vast as seen in this PDF of a decade of Scientific Studies on this topic. Some highlights include:

  • “When children engage in authentic play in nature-based outdoor spaces, they develop skills in a variety of domains simultaneously.” – Miller, D.L., Tichota, K,.White, J. (2009).
  • “Sullivan has revealed that the symptoms of children with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) are relieved after contact with nature. The greener the setting, the more the relief.” – Taylor, A., Kuo, F. & Sullivan, W. (2001).
  • “Children who regularly have positive personal experiences with the natural world show more advanced motor fitness, including coordination, balance and agility.” – Fjortoft, Ingunn (2001).

In addition to the learning benefits to boredom and time in nature, there is also the issue of free play. This article from Parenting Science explores over a decade of studies about the benefits of unstructured play time. The author is careful to note that free play does not mean physcial education classes or sports. Free play is just that. Unstructured play time, which is proven to help math skills, language development, and creative problem solving.

  • “Play and exploration trigger the secretion of BDNF, a substance essential for the growth of brain cells.”
  • “Psychologist Edward Fisher analyzed 46 published studies of the cognitive benefits of play (Fisher 1999). He found that “sociodramatic play”—what happens when kids pretend together—’results in improved performances in both cognitive-linguistic and social affective domains.'”

And finally, before you schedule a summer of busy stimulation, consider this article and advice from Simplicity Parenting writer Kim John Payne. He says:

“[When Google is hiring they say] ‘we’re less concerned about grades and transcripts and more interested in how you think.'”

If we rewind to a childhood that makes an adult like that, what do we see? Is it racing around from one prep course to another? From soccer to piano to Mandarin? A childhood on the clock and filling up the gaps with zoning on the iPad and obsessing about making more friends on Facebook?

I don’t think so.

When we really look at what happens for a kid when they slow down, tune in to themselves, take space and get busy in serious play, we can see that what they are learning is how to be create a kind of inner structure that will serve them (and us) well in the world ahead. … Play provides a deep and wide-reaching  domain for kids to experiment with the real work of the real world.”


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Head, Heart & Hands in Waldorf Education

»Posted by on May 19, 2015 in Curriculum, Research | 0 comments

ProudPotatoWhat does it mean when we say, in Waldorf, that children learn through their “head, heart and hands?” It references multidisciplinary teaching and the balance built into Waldorf education curriculum.  Why do we focus on a balanced education?

Our world thrives on balance — ecosystems, economies, and governments all perform most optimally when things are allowed to ebb and flow yet stay ultimately centered, not through force but through compromise. This balance is key to stable growth and transformation.

Eighth Grade BuddiesEducation is transformation of a generation and an individual. The task at hand is to guide young people as they grow and change, so that they may contribute meaningfully to a growing and changing world. This is no small task. When you consider the vital role that education plays within society and within the individual, then you can understand why balance in education is so essential. In order for the world to thrive, it needs to be filled with balanced individuals.

Waldorf education’s founder, Rudolph Steiner, a philosopher in the early 20th century, understood balanced education to mean the integration of the arts across the curriculum, the inclusion of movement and nature in everyday learning, and a focus on more subjects than just “the three Rs.”

EducationinActionCropHere in the 21st century, the comprehensive approach of Waldorf education has been supported by modern science. One might notice how Waldorf schools focus on fostering each of the multiple intelligences Howard Gardner identifies in his book Frames of Mind. Gardner, a developmental psychologist and professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, addresses the need to teach children thoroughly in each of these intelligences: verbal / linguistic, logical / mathematical, body / kinesthetic, visual / spatial, musical / rhythmic, interpersonal / intrapersonal. and naturalistic.

He, like Ken Robinson in this popular TED talk on education, argues against judging children’s intelligence on only one or two of these areas — a philosophy embodied in this Einstein quote:  “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

Children who enter adulthood understanding their strengths, having been shown them through a balanced education, can contribute to the world in a fulfilling and meaningful way.

How do we realize balance within Waldorf education?  Here are some examples:

Grade3-2Verbal / Linguistic – Teachers tell story, myth, and history by reciting poems, singing songs, and playing games. The complex vocabulary and imagery found in these oral activities bring verbal language to life and give depth to a child’s understanding of and desire to engage with written material. Children also make their own textbooks as an alternative to Chalk and talk note taking. And students begin to learn foreign languages beginning in first grade, when their brains are most primed to absorb this information.

Logical / Mathematical – Waldorf students learn math in many ways — intervals through music, geometry and measurement through woodworking and drawing, and math facts through holding and counting items. Logic is ever-present in the immediate apprehension of cause and effect inherent in science, music, and nature.

Camp2Body / Kinesthetic – Developing this intelligence goes beyond gym class for Waldorf students, who constantly learn through movement. Examples include time outside for recess, nature walks, gardening, the study of movement in eurhythmy and dance, and in-class movement through acting out stories, tapping sticks to math, or throwing balls while reciting multiplication tables.

Visual / Spatial – Whether it is creating a diorama of an animal, knitting and other handwork, sculpting with beeswax or clay, or taking a year to turn a log into a chair, Waldorf students learn much in the visual and spatial realm in their woodwork, handwork, gardening, and main lesson classrooms.

ChorusMusical / Rhythmic – Music is part of each day and each subject in Waldorf school. Song and rhythm are integral parts of the young child’s classroom. Layered onto this ever-present choral influence are musical instruments: flutes and recorders are introduced in younger grades, violins and other strings for students in the middle grades, and finally instruments of a child’s choice in the upper grades.

Interpersonal / Intrapersonal – Social skills are not left to chance in Waldorf education. Teachers spend much of their time in the early years helping children develop their interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence. One of the most important contributors to cultivating these two intelligences is the structure of the main lesson classroom, where students remain with the same teacher throughout all eight grades. Learning to work together as a whole is not optional, but essential and teachers focus on developing a harmonious and balanced classroom through providing time and structure for social interactions as well as time for reflection.

FirstDayMeadowNaturalistic – Unlike many of their public school peers, Waldorf students still get recess, so they are out in nature, many times a day and in all seasons. They are also taught many academic lessons outdoors, such as botany and geology through nature walks and gardening. Older children often have main lesson class time outdoors, and gym class is held outside when weather permits.

Though developed by Steiner nearly a century ago, current research demonstrates Waldorf education’s ability to educate children intellectually, creativity and socially, prepares them to make meaningful contributions to our ever-changing world throughout the course of their lives.


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Waldorf and Music Training

»Posted by on Feb 3, 2015 in Curriculum, Research | 0 comments

Violins1Facebook has been abuzz lately with articles about the benefits of musical training on the brains and learning abilities of our children. The influence of music training on learning has long been cultivated in Waldorf Education, where musical instrument training begins in Grade 1 with pentatonic flutes and moves to stringed instruments by Grade 4. Students also receive choral training, study music reading and notation, and learn Solfege.

This latest round of internet excitement comes from a new study released by researchers at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. They found that children between age 6 and 18 had both physiological and behavioral benefits from musical instrument training.

According to this Washington Post article, Music Lessons Spur Emotional and Behavioral Growth in Children, James Hudziak, Director of the Vermont Center for Children, Youth and Families, says, “What we found was the more a child trained on an instrument [the more it] accelerated cortical organization in attention skill, anxiety management and emotional control.” When children played and practiced playing an instrument, it thickened an area of the brain related toexecutive functioning, including working memory, attention control, as well as organisation and planning for the future.”

CellosThis new study is also layered on top of three additional studies published late in 2013 by The Society for Neuroscience. According to the press release, those finding show that [l]ong-term high level musical training has a broader impact than previously thought. Researchers found that musicians have an enhanced ability to integrate sensory information from hearing, touch, and sight (Julie Roy, abstract 550.13).

The age at which musical training begins affects brain anatomy as an adult; beginning training before the age of seven has the greatest impact (Yunxin Wang, abstract 765.07).

Brain circuits involved in musical improvisation are shaped by systematic training, leading to less reliance on working memory and more extensive connectivity within the rain (Ana Pinho, MS, abstract 122.13).

Music Training at SGWS

Here at Spring Garden Waldorf School, musical training is seen as a layering of abilities. What is taught in the early grades is built upon each year, as more and more is expected musically from the students. Children are given regular opportunities to perform their music, at monthly Assemblies and also at Concerts and Festivals.

Grades 1 & 2:

In the early years, music is an expression and embodiment of imagination. In Grades One and Two, children learn music from the pentatonic scale both in song and on their flutes or recorders.

Grade 3:

In Grade Three, during the nine-year change, children are ready to begin learning the language of music. A diatonic scale is introduced with a new recorder, notes are named by letter, and children learn basic music notation such as the scale and clef. Third graders also begin Solfege – a music education method used to teach pitch and sight singing.

Grade 4:

Grade Four brings fraction studies, and fractions bring quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes, which then leads to teaching rhythms, rounds, and some simple harmony. Now that the language of music has been introduced, children begin to play musical instruments, starting with the violin.

Grade 5:

Students in Grade Five are ready for three parts in choral music. Accidentals are also introduced in this grade, and new keys are taught beyond the key of C. Students also continue to master the violin with regular training and performance.

Grade 6:

In Grade Six, children can choose to expand their instrumental repertoire by selecting a different stringed instrument to master beyond the violin. They also learn and master written music from the Medieval period, aligning music with the Main Lesson curriculum. Acoustics are also studied this year.

Grade 7 & 8:

Middle School layers skills and practice upon all that has been learned before. Ensemble choirs read music and sing in harmony and rhythm. Sight singing also begins and Solfege study continues, and Orchestra is part of every student’s curriculum. Students can also begin training on woodwind instruments in the upper grades, if they so choose, or they can continue to master their stringed instrument choices.

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Sleep Well; Learn Well

»Posted by on Jan 15, 2015 in Research | 0 comments

Waldorf educators teach in a three day rhythm: presenting information or an experience the first day; discussion, review, and recall the second day; and doing something physical with the information the third day, such as expressing the information through writing or art. What is the commonality in this three day approach?  The importance of sleep.

Why poor sleep leads to poor academic performance

We all know sleep is important, especially for our children’s emotional well-being, but what about their academic well-being? Research shows that good sleep is essential to learning, especially influencing specific types of memory, high level cognitive functioning, and achievement motivation.

Children need, according to

  • 12-14 hours for children between 1 and 3.
  • 11-13 hours for children between 3 and 5.
  • 10-11 hours for children between 5 and 12.
  • 8.5 -10 hours for teens.


The Research

Numerous studies on sleep and academics have found that sleep deprivation and low sleep quality leads to lagging achievement. Two such studies were summarized in this news article, Improve Your Child’s School Performance with a Good Night’s Sleep. In one quoted study, researchers found that children who had difficulty falling asleep and woke up at least once a night were significantly more likely to have school achievement difficulties. A different study of high school students noted that those with higher grades slept around 30 minutes longer per night, went to bed earlier, and had less variation in their weekend schedules.

In a study of Dutch school children between the ages of nine and fourteen, Time in bed, quality of sleep and school functioning of children (Journal of Sleep Research 9:I2, p145), researchers found that children with better sleep quality (those who felt rested and had regular bedtimes) performed better in school, and perhaps most interestingly, were more open to the teacher’s influence and more motivated to do well.

This University of Pittsburgh study, The impact of inadequate sleep on children’s daytime cognitive function, published in Seminar of Pediatric Neurology (March 1996, Volume 1, p.44) found that inadequate sleep in school children resulted in difficulty focusing, irritability, emotional instability, and a lower threshold for frustration.


The Reason

Two Harvard Education articles review Harvard research to best answer the question, “Why does sleep affect learning?” They each point to the affect poor sleep has on both memory and higher level cognitive functioning.

HMSlogoIn this article, Sleep, Learning and Memory, from the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School, researchers declare that, “the general consensus is that consolidated sleep throughout a whole night is optimal for learning and memory.” More specifically, they look at a function called memory consolidation, which takes place during sleep, which seems to help students to process what they learned the previous day. The current hypothesis is “that slow-wave sleep (SWS), which is deep, restorative sleep, also plays a significant role in declarative memory by processing and consolidating newly acquired information.”

This is particularly interesting to Waldorf Educators, who adhere to a main lesson block learning style that taps into a rhythm of learning a topic, stepping away from it, and returning to it a day later – a concept Rudolph Steiner believed allowed children to absorb and process the information more thoroughly.

Good sleep is essential not only for memory but also for higher cognition. In this article from the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard, Sleep, Performance, and Public Safety, researchers also found that sleep deprivation led to a decline in the subjects’ ability to access higher-level cognitive functions. “After a period of sleep deprivation, there are noticeable changes in brain activity, as measured by an electroencephalogram (EEG).”

Researchers found, in particular, that the prefrontal cortex, responsible for many higher-level thinking was particularly vulnerable to a lack of sleep. “As a result, people who are sleep deprived will begin to show deficits in many tasks that require logical reasoning or complex thought. … In addition to the feeling of sleepiness and changes in brain activity that accompany a night without sleep, other measures of performance are noticeably altered. Concentration, working memory, mathematical capacity, and logical reasoning are all aspects of cognitive function compromised by sleep deprivation.”


What to do?

First and foremost, consider eliminating screen time before bed. Waldorf parents limit screen time more so than most, but it is important to remember that screen time around bedtime is potentially the most detrimental.

As recently reported on in Businessweek’s article, Kids Who Sleep Near Their Smartphones Get Less Shuteye, a study published in Journal of Pediatrics, joins many others in reporting that televisions, phones and tablets in children’s rooms and beds negatively impact sleep.

Next to consider is consistent bedtimes. Organizations like the are going so far as to label it “Sleep Hygiene,” recognizing that the habituation of a sleep routine is as important in maintaining children’s physical health as bathing or brushing their teeth. As the studies above have noted, children who go to bed at an earlier time and consistently (weekdays and weekends), get more sleep, wake feeling rested and do better in school.

And finally, consider educating older children about the importance of sleep. With third party evidence and scientific research supporting your family’s bedtime “hygiene,” a teenager may be more willing to comply and adopt healthy sleep habits once outside the home.

Get a good night’s rest for better learning tomorrow!


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Waldorf Perspective on Child Development

»Posted by on Dec 6, 2014 in Curriculum, Research | 0 comments

On November 19th, Spring Garden’s current Grade Six teacher, Michael Gannon, hosted a lecture titled Child Development 101. During this Coffee and Conversation, he explored the Waldorf perspective on child development through the different classes and ages.

To this!According to Gannon, “Waldorf education strives to see the child for where they are, right now, understand how they are developing, and then work to support that in the classroom.”

Gannon began by explaining Rudolph Steiner’s understanding of child development, which was very forward thinking at his time. A contemporary of Freud and Piaget, Steiner’s training as a philosopher inspired him to look beyond brain development and into the corresponding realms of the social, physical, and spiritual development.

He felt a child’s development was an Epigenesis — a cognitive, social, spiritual, and physical process through distinct stages— leading to a differentiated state of adulthood based on how these elements were influenced. And, of course, one of the primary influences is education.

Steiner divided child development into three distinct stages and labeled them based on the primary force driving a child’s experience in the world. Ages 0-7 are defined by Will, ages 7-14 by Feeling, and ages 14-21 by Thinking. Through each phase, the child works to understand and eventually utilize these forces.

0-7: Will

Every action of an infant is done from their own will — a will that strives to survive, to crawl, to walk — all with little to no encouragement from the outside world. This intense desire to do their will continues far beyond infancy. According to Gannon, before the age seven, the child works from instinct converted into impulse and desire, which can then be harnessed into learning and behavior.

RainGearKidsThat is why, ideally, children during this stage spend as much time as possible learning to master the use of their bodies. It is best for them to do this on a schedule, using their will in a constructive way, as opposed to being told to subdue their will for a specific task. Imitation of the behaviors they see is a natural process for children of this age, and providing healthy models for that imitation, without intellectual explanation, allows the will to develop more fully.

This is also why the day moves between work and play in Waldorf early childhood classes. The work, a channeling of the young child’s will, happens through imitation of meaningful tasks versus an authoritative coercion to understand concepts. At this stage, children will develop their physical, cognitive, and social skills from unstructured play as their will and desire runs up against the forces of the outside world.

7-14: Feeling

ChimesAfter age seven, a child’s world expands beyond the self, and with this expansion, they develop a great subtlety of feeling. Gannon explains that children’s feelings dominate their world in this stage as they move between joy and sadness and learn to manage these different emotions within the greater, more expansive world now open to them.

The healthy feeling life of the child is supported by providing a context of beauty for all things, from simple movements to complex ideas. By appealing to their natural imaginative capacities, children can be encouraged to use these active feelings to connect to learning as a process.

It is at this time that children are ready for academic instruction, as long as it continues to appeal to social and physical realms and, even more so, the realm of feeling. This is why Waldorf grade school lessons are taught through engaging stories of trial and triumph. Children who sympathize and relate to a story in these years are moved to carry the information and process it in a deep and meaningful way that persists as they grow into a more conceptual and thinking way of being.

14-21: Thinking

By the time they reach high school, children are ready to work with their thoughts and beliefs. They are ready to think critically and evaluate the world around them. Where they first learned to manage their will and then work with their feelings, they now learn to work with their thoughts.

Grade7-3According to Gannon, children at this stage become immersed in the world of ideas and have the capacity to think abstractly and critically, seeing both sides of a story, which can then be broken down and criticized. Steiner believed that, along with their search for knowledge, children at this age also search for truth as they work to make their lives their own. He believed that teaching through a sense of idealism and justice was essential for the health of the young adult, who, if not given role models of hope, would succumb to cynicism.

This is why older children in Waldorf Education are often engaged in service to their community and encouraged to contribute their gifts to the world in a meaningful way.

It is with this understanding of child development that Waldorf educators work to support and teach children. Incorporating and addressing these stages of development, every day and within every subject, allows Waldorf schools to educate the whole child by teaching

the right subject matter at the right time, in the right way.

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Waldorf Education Subjects & Multiple Intelligences

»Posted by on Nov 17, 2014 in Research | 0 comments

Chart Created by Jeff Tunkey at

Chart Created by Jeff Tunkey at

Ever known a math whiz who can’t jump rope? Or maybe you know the world’s most competent linguist who is tone deaf or cannot balance his checkbook. Our daily experiences demonstrate that smart” is not defined by a single measure. Howard Gardner, American developmental psychologist and Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, developed the theory of multiple intelligences that has revolutionized the way educators think about learning.

The idea of one “general” intelligence ruling someone’s abilities has become an outdated notion since Gardner published his theory of multiple intelligences in 1983. Waldorf educators, following the impulses of Austrian scientist and philosopher Rudolph Steiner, have been focusing on the education of the whole child since the late 19th century.

Recently, Jeff Tunkey at created this comprehensive chart about how Waldorf schools’ subject classes help develop multiple intelligences in our children.

We at Spring Garden Waldorf School have created a detailed blog series discussing how each of Gardner’s eight intelligences is fostered in the Waldorf classroom. Read more on how each of these intelligences are developed at Spring Garden Waldorf by clicking the links below:

Verbal / linguistic

Logical/ mathematical

Body/ kinesthetic

Visual/ spatial

Music/ rhythmic

Interpersonal & Intrapersonal




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