Waldorf Compared to Public School – Early Academics

In our article A Comparison of Waldorf and Public School, we broke down key elements that differentiate the two pedagogies by looking at the way each approaches early academics, curriculum, classroom environment, teaching methods, social learning, individuality, and relation to society as a whole. In the following series, we will look at each of these […]

The Science Behind Waldorf Kindergarten Classroom Design

Early Childhood classrooms in Waldorf schools look different. Some parents are initially surprised by the lack of primary colors and maps and charts that normally festoon the walls of “traditional” preschool rooms. Won’t the kids find this … boring? According to recent research on the topic of classroom design, they won’t consider it at all, […]

The Case for a Summer Slowdown

If you Google, “Summer break with children,” you get two types of search results — a variety of activity lists or articles about the evils of summer’s off. Turns out they call it “summer fade,” which is a one month backslide in learning coupled with an increase in Body Mass Index (BMI) for kids. Many parents […]

Head, Heart & Hands in Waldorf Education

What does it mean when we say, in Waldorf, that children learn through their “head, heart and hands?” It references multidisciplinary teaching and the balance built into Waldorf education curriculum.  Why do we focus on a balanced education? Our world thrives on balance — ecosystems, economies, and governments all perform most optimally when things are allowed to […]

Waldorf and Music Training

Facebook has been abuzz lately with articles about the benefits of musical training on the brains and learning abilities of our children. The influence of music training on learning has long been cultivated in Waldorf Education, where musical instrument training begins in Grade 1 with pentatonic flutes and moves to stringed instruments by Grade 4. Students […]

Sleep Well; Learn Well

Waldorf educators teach in a three day rhythm: presenting information or an experience the first day; discussion, review, and recall the second day; and doing something physical with the information the third day, such as expressing the information through writing or art. What is the commonality in this three day approach?  The importance of sleep. […]

Waldorf Perspective on Child Development

On November 19th, Spring Garden’s current Grade Six teacher, Michael Gannon, hosted a lecture titled Child Development 101. During this Coffee and Conversation, he explored the Waldorf perspective on child development through the different classes and ages. According to Gannon, “Waldorf education strives to see the child for where they are, right now, understand how […]

Waldorf Education Subjects & Multiple Intelligences

Ever known a math whiz who can’t jump rope? Or maybe you know the world’s most competent linguist who is tone deaf or cannot balance his checkbook. Our daily experiences demonstrate that “smart” is not defined by a single measure. Howard Gardner, American developmental psychologist and Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard […]

Make Time for Routine

Routine is good for children. It makes them feel safe: kids who have solid routines know what’s coming most of the time and can better adapt to the occasional unexpected event. Routine also helps make parents’ lives easier and improves children’s behavior. But in modern life, hectic schedules often disrupt routine. While ditching a formal […]