Waldorf Kids — Outside in All Weather

»Posted by on Mar 2, 2015 in Curriculum | 0 comments

FirstDayMeadowAt Spring Garden Waldorf School, children go outside to play three times a day in all weather. This can seem like a foreign concept in our modern times. Won’t they get cold or wet or overheat? Will this make them sick? Ruin their clothes? Shouldn’t they be inside spending more time on academics?

Waldorf educators have been following the science of outdoor play for decades, and research has demonstrated again and again that the benefits are overwhelming.

The National Wildlife Federation’s publication, The Forecast Calls for Play, has compiled 25 of the latest studies about what happens to kids who spend time in nature. The takeaway?

“Kids who play outdoors maintain healthier body weights, are less likely to be near-sighted and have healthier vitamin D levels. In addition, green time enhances empathy, lengthens attention spans and improves critical thinking skills.”

RainGearKidsIn a Waldorf school, part of educating our students means building at least an hour of outdoor time into each day to enrich our student’s bodies and minds. We know that busy parents can have trouble making sure kids get outside the recommended hour per day. We are here to help.

Although being cold and wet does not make a children sick, our parents know that our Waldorf supply list is dominated by outdoor gear requirements to keep kids comfortable during their hour-plus outdoors.

Being comfortable outside is key to experiencing all nature-based play has to offer. This is also why, in addition to a set of both rain and winter coats, boots, pants, hats, scarves, and gloves, children must always have extra clothes on hand in the classroom if the gear fails to keep their clothes dry and warm. In our warm months, children are encouraged to come to school with their sun hats, water bottles, and sunscreen applied and ready to begin their day outdoors.

Of course, we hope children, especially the young ones, go outside to play at home both after school and on weekends. As it turns out, weather is what most often keeps parents hesitant about outdoor play for their kids.

SNOWAccording to a 2012 survey of 1000 parents commissioned by National Wildlife Federation (NWF), weather topped the list of barriers to getting kids outdoors. Sixty-one percent of those surveyed cited weather as most problematic, over concerns about strangers (38%), homework (31%), and a busy schedule (5%).

Luckily, Waldorf parents already have the necessary gear to send kids outside and the understanding that outdoor play is essential to their children’s well-being. Since Waldorf educators don’t load homework onto younger students, the kids have the time they need to go

outside for unstructured play.

So go ahead, send them out to play! Want to go with them and not sure what to do? Check out the National Wildlife Federation Activity Ideas HERE.

Eurythmy Movement Workshop

»Posted by on Feb 26, 2015 in Just For Fun, School News | 0 comments

Eurythmy

The Waldorf Class Play

»Posted by on Feb 22, 2015 in Curriculum | 0 comments

Play8Parents of Waldorf students get to see their children perform a play every spring. But why? Don’t tell the kids, but it’s not just for fun. Class plays are grounded in each grade’s individual curriculum and the appropriate developmental level of the students. Students act out what they’ve learned throughout the year in the language arts and bring their curriculum to life. This not only helps children truly remember what they’ve learned, but also gives students an opportunity to showcase other skills and employ teamwork.

Class plays incorporate music, recitation, memorization, acting, and visual arts (via set and costume preparations). Also, the play meets children at a place of their age’s unique social development — both in story and practice. The practice and performance of a play requires age-appropriate finesse in social learning and group dynamics. The play’s topic, or storyline, also seeks to address the struggles felt by the particular age group.

In grade 4, for example, a play about Norse mythology and the troublemaking of Loki reminds children of the consequences of their own budding morality and of their choices as they emerge from early childhood into an expanded worldview.

The parts within a play begin mostly as chorus in younger grades; as the children grow, so do the expectations for bringing individual characters to life. Waldorf teachers, who have been with their students through all the grades, know them well and give parts that challenge or complement each student’s personality. Through plays, students can be guided to emerge or develop from a comfortable place within themselves or perhaps play a part of someone very different and challenging.

Perhaps most importantly, the children feel exuberance and joy bringing their lessons to life for their loved ones during the class play. It is a culmination and presentation of much of the hard work done that year for the students. And they are understandably proud of their work.

Ed Choice Enrollment

»Posted by on Feb 20, 2015 in School News | 0 comments

EdChoice Scholarship Program   Ohio Department of EducationSpring Garden Waldorf School accepts Ed Choice scholarship students. Families must apply and be accepted to Spring Garden before they can apply for one of the state-funded scholarships. Scholarship applications are accepted between February and  April and are now available to students who attend a low-performing public school.

The Ohio Department of Education offers the Educational Choice Scholarship (EdChoice) Program. This program was created to provide students from underperforming public schools with the opportunity to attend participating private schools. The Ed Choice Scholarship provides up to 60,000 state funded scholarships to students who attend low performing public school buildings.  The scholarship must be used to attend private schools that meet requirement for program participation.  Spring Garden Waldorf School is a participant in this program.

For the 2015-16 school year, EdChoice Scholarships will also be available to incoming kindergartners, first grade students, and second grade students whose family income is at or below 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. The application process is open now. Please click here to learn more about eligibility and the application process.

Please note if you live in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, you are not eligible for the EdChoice Scholarship.

 

 

 

Help “Raise the Roof” with Crowdfunding! 

»Posted by on Feb 20, 2015 in School News | 0 comments

SGWS has partnered with YouCaring, an online crowdfunding resource, to raise funds for the Raise the Roof Capital Campaign. We chose YouCaring because 100% of the dollars raised go to the non-profit of choice — in this case, us!
If you have not yet given, please click here and donate today to our Raise the Roof Capital Campaign. Also, please consider sharing the link with friends via email and social media to gain support for the campaign.
Thanks to everyone for helping to spread the word and Raise the Roof!

 

Sample Day for Preschool

»Posted by on Feb 11, 2015 in Early Childhood, School News | 0 comments

FirstDayMeadowAre you interested in Spring Garden Waldorf School for your Pre-K child?  We have a free sample morning classes available for interested parents and their children.

On this day, you can join your child and walk through the rhythmic, warm, sensory filled experience of a Waldorf early childhood classroom  The morning will include circle time, art activity and story time lead by our Nursery Preschool teacher, Miss Kathy.

If you have a child between the ages of 3 and 4, you are invited to join us for a sample preschool morning on March 21st from 9 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

PreschoolImage2

This experience is offered to you at no cost, but you must register as space is limited.  Please click below to register.

Age 3-4, March 21: Register Now!

As a special offer, parents who choose to apply for preschool following this experience will be discounted the application fee ($70).  Have questions or need more information? Please contact Amy Hecky at admissions@sgws.org.

Waldorf and Music Training

»Posted by on Feb 3, 2015 in Curriculum, Research | 0 comments

Violins1Facebook has been abuzz lately with articles about the benefits of musical training on the brains and learning abilities of our children. The influence of music training on learning has long been cultivated in Waldorf Education, where musical instrument training begins in Grade 1 with pentatonic flutes and moves to stringed instruments by Grade 4. Students also receive choral training, study music reading and notation, and learn Solfege.

This latest round of internet excitement comes from a new study released by researchers at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. They found that children between age 6 and 18 had both physiological and behavioral benefits from musical instrument training.

According to this Washington Post article, Music Lessons Spur Emotional and Behavioral Growth in Children, James Hudziak, Director of the Vermont Center for Children, Youth and Families, says, “What we found was the more a child trained on an instrument [the more it] accelerated cortical organization in attention skill, anxiety management and emotional control.” When children played and practiced playing an instrument, it thickened an area of the brain related toexecutive functioning, including working memory, attention control, as well as organisation and planning for the future.”

CellosThis new study is also layered on top of three additional studies published late in 2013 by The Society for Neuroscience. According to the press release, those finding show that [l]ong-term high level musical training has a broader impact than previously thought. Researchers found that musicians have an enhanced ability to integrate sensory information from hearing, touch, and sight (Julie Roy, abstract 550.13).

The age at which musical training begins affects brain anatomy as an adult; beginning training before the age of seven has the greatest impact (Yunxin Wang, abstract 765.07).

Brain circuits involved in musical improvisation are shaped by systematic training, leading to less reliance on working memory and more extensive connectivity within the rain (Ana Pinho, MS, abstract 122.13).

Music Training at SGWS

Here at Spring Garden Waldorf School, musical training is seen as a layering of abilities. What is taught in the early grades is built upon each year, as more and more is expected musically from the students. Children are given regular opportunities to perform their music, at monthly Assemblies and also at Concerts and Festivals.

Grades 1 & 2:

In the early years, music is an expression and embodiment of imagination. In Grades One and Two, children learn music from the pentatonic scale both in song and on their flutes or recorders.

Grade 3:

In Grade Three, during the nine-year change, children are ready to begin learning the language of music. A diatonic scale is introduced with a new recorder, notes are named by letter, and children learn basic music notation such as the scale and clef. Third graders also begin Solfege – a music education method used to teach pitch and sight singing.

Grade 4:

Grade Four brings fraction studies, and fractions bring quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes, which then leads to teaching rhythms, rounds, and some simple harmony. Now that the language of music has been introduced, children begin to play musical instruments, starting with the violin.

Grade 5:

Students in Grade Five are ready for three parts in choral music. Accidentals are also introduced in this grade, and new keys are taught beyond the key of C. Students also continue to master the violin with regular training and performance.

Grade 6:

In Grade Six, children can choose to expand their instrumental repertoire by selecting a different stringed instrument to master beyond the violin. They also learn and master written music from the Medieval period, aligning music with the Main Lesson curriculum. Acoustics are also studied this year.

Grade 7 & 8:

Middle School layers skills and practice upon all that has been learned before. Ensemble choirs read music and sing in harmony and rhythm. Sight singing also begins and Solfege study continues, and Orchestra is part of every student’s curriculum. Students can also begin training on woodwind instruments in the upper grades, if they so choose, or they can continue to master their stringed instrument choices.